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Driving Force
MICHAEL BAMBERGER
July 26, 2010
In a summer to remember for South Africa, a white golfer (Louis Oosthuizen) and a black caddie (Zack Rasego) teamed to blow away the field in the game's biggest event, the British Open, on its grandest stage, the Old Course
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July 26, 2010

Driving Force

In a summer to remember for South Africa, a white golfer (Louis Oosthuizen) and a black caddie (Zack Rasego) teamed to blow away the field in the game's biggest event, the British Open, on its grandest stage, the Old Course

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There's one true world golf championship. It's played every five years, when the British Open comes to St. Andrews, as it did last week. In Sunday's soft dusk, local kids lined the cozy lanes bordering the Old Course, cheering for various fresh-off-the-leader-board heroes from England and Ireland (northern division), from Sweden and Germany and Spain, from the U.S. and, right at the top, from South Africa. The World Cup, Part 2.

The claret jug was lifted that night by modest Louis Oosthuizen (WEST-hi-zin) of South Africa, winner by an immodest seven shots over Lee Westwood of England. (Jin Jeong, 20, of South Korea was the low amateur, finishing 14th.) Oosthuizen, 27, has a stylish, powerful swing, a pretty wife, a baby girl and a caddie fluent in three languages. Oosthuizen and his caddie, Zack Rasego, discussed club selection in Afrikaans, the South African language with Dutch lineage. They conducted their interviews in English. And when Rasego called home to speak to his wife, he used Tswana, a language spoken by three million black South Africans, Rasego among them.

Last week's Open was more about symbols than anything else: the white South African golfer and the black South African caddie marching across Swilcan Bridge side by side. Summer 2010 has been a coming out party for the new South Africa. When the final putt was holed, Rasego, who counseled Oosthuizen on most of the 272 shots he played, reached out to give his boss an old-school handshake. Shrek (the golfer's nickname, courtesy of the gap between his front teeth) turned it into a hug. The caddie, who has known poverty and apartheid, wasn't fully ready for it.

Oosthuizen is full of surprises. In sporting terms, the biggest of them was that a golfer who had previously played in only eight majors, missing the cut in seven of them, could not only win in his ninth major start but also blow away the field.

And as soon as he was done, there was another surprise. In his acceptance speech, at the top of the thank-yous, before he mentioned his parents and his wife (Nel-Mare) and the fans, he gave a shout-out to Nelson Mandela, the former president who has devoted his life to ending apartheid in South Africa. Mandela's 92nd birthday fell on British Open Sunday.

"Louis is not a political person," Rasego said later. "I felt my spine running."

The champion golfer of the year (the title is courtesy of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club) grew up in the rural southern South African town of Albertinia, where his father, Piet, has a dairy farm with 110 head. Piet was a good tennis player and so was Louis. But Louis, doing his own thing, found his way to the local nine-holer, with its sand-and-oil greens. If you want to groove a perfect stroke, learn to putt on sand greens. They're slow (as are the greens at St. Andrews) but absolutely true.

"Louis was not very keen for milking, but he did like driving the tractors," Piet said on Sunday. It was late afternoon, the cows were grazing, and Piet and his wife, Minnie, watched on TV as their son played in the British Open with a heady lead. Piet sounded like the picture of Afrikaner calm.

He was asked, "Are you glad Louis chose golf over tennis?"

"Up to now," the father said, "it has been good."

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